10 easy ideas to post on your Social Media

A lot of people we meet who aren’t yet using Social Media or haven’t fully integrated it into their marketing plans ask us what they should post on their Social Media channels.

There are literally hundreds of things you can post about but for some simple outgoing post suggestions for your social media, see below.   We recommend the 80/20 rule i.e. 80% sharing useful information and content and engaging with your audience and just 20% directed to your business.

1.  Promotional offers for your products/services

2. How your product/services solve your customers’ problems or help them

3. Comparisions of yours to other similar products/services

4. Reviews of your products/services or testimonials/case studies

5. Best of, top sellers or customers’ favourites

6. Your USP

7.  What you’re working on right now

9.  Industry news

10. Share photos or video of your people doing their work or using your products

We’ll post some more suggestions in the future, but hopefully these will give you some inspiration if you’re struggling with what to talk about.  Don’t forget, we’re very social and happy to join you in conversation, especially on Twitter, so do follow us @DotSocialise and

Wendy Ager @WendyAnnAger

Stephanie Darkes @StephanieDarkes

Ania Wilk-Lawton @AniaWL

Have you had enough of Facebook?

When Facebook was in full swing, it was some small business’s dream marketing tool; it was free, people were buying into it and it was a great way to communicate with customers and potential customers. But lately, the bubble feels like it’s bursting and as it become harder and more costly to promote your business on Facebook and posts on business pages are getting less and less reach.

Is Facebook disappearing to the bottom of your list of marketing priorities?

Time magazine tells us that The Free Marketing Gravy Train Is Over on Facebook, but we’ve known that for a while haven’t we? If Mark Zuckerberg didn’t capitalise on his enormous audience and the people that bought into Facebook (us) he’d be a laughing stock in the business world and an urban folk hero in the world of the ‘everyday person’

It used to be that we would suggest our clients all include a Facebook page in their marketing mix because you could always get some leverage, but now, it is very much dependant in the nature of the business and the budget that they have for Facebook ads and post boosting.

These days if you want to market your business for free, don’t look at Facebook!

Why and how to use Twitter Lists

Lists are extremely useful.  You can group people together in Twitter lists so that you can go and just see those people’s Tweets.  It’s also useful because you don’t have to follow the people you put into Lists and so you don’t have to follow them but still get to see their Tweets.  It’s another way of seeing people’s Tweets if and when you want to and you don’t have to be following them.   You can have 1000 different lists and put 5000 people in any of them, one or more.

You can create your own lists or subscribe to lists created by others. 

To create your own list,  go to the gear icon drop down menu in the top right navigation bar or from profile page just click on Lists.   That’s where you go to look at Tweets by people you’ve put in Lists and manage your lists etc.  

To add Tweeters to your lists, click the gear icon by the the Users profile and you’ll see ‘Add to List’.  

Whether to keep your Lists public or private is up to you.  If you have a bunch of confidential clients, influencers and competitors you want to ‘watch’ what they’re Tweeting about then you’ll probably want to make those private.   If you’re making a good list of contacts in one field or location that others might want to follow we’d suggest you make them Public, and that you name them clearly and positively and you’ll get other people following your lists.   

To follow other people’s lists, from their Profile click on Lists and subscribe.

 

For more on detail and help with Lists try Twitter’s “I’m having trouble with lists” information in the Help Centre.

Social Media Marketing for Croydon’s Meanwhile Use

 On Wednesday, 26th we shared our Social Media knowledge at the Meanwhile Use Croydon Marketing Day at Matthews Yard.    We were asked to provide advice on setting up a social media strategy and social media profiles.   

We stepped-in and ran the whole morning session based on our two presentations, with networking and coffee between.   Stephanie talked on creating a successful social media strategy and Wendy talked about social media profiles and improving your online presence.  There were a real mix of people in the audience, from those with an interesting idea for the Meanwhile Use Croydon scheme and some others interested in Social Media marketing for their businesses.  

It was the last day of workshops and finished with Sally Williams talking from Retail Revival.   The final applications for the Meanwhile Use Croydon competition are due in by 30th March.   

We are happy to connect you with a very supportive local online community in Croydon for campaigns, ideas and companies, so if you are on/join any of the Social Media platforms do connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest and Google+.  

 

You can now tag your friends on mobile Twitter images!

In a bid to keep up with Facebook, Twitter have incorporated the ability to tag your friends in your photos on your mobile with their ‘tap to mention’ facility.

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You can tag up to ten people in one photo WITHOUT using any of your 140 characters.. About time too, we say!

Twitter have also added a collage option allowing you to add up to four photos in a single tweet, if you aren’t seeing any of these changes, get updating!

But if you don’t want to be tagged, fear not! You can opt out.  Simply go to your Twitter privacy settings and change your default setting for photo sharing “Allow anyone to tag me in photos” to either only people you already follow can tag you, or turn it off completely. You can also untag yourself from any photos by tapping the three dots below the tweet and select “Remove tag from photo.”

Related articles
Twitter gets a new look… it’s Facebook: ‘Tags’ and ‘shares’ appear on micro-blogging platform

Support Croydon’s Meanwhile Use

Meanwhile Use turns empty spaces and places into opportunities for communities and businesses.  It is the temporary use of buildings or land for a socially beneficial purpose until they can be brought back into commercial use.  The Meanwhile Use Toolkit provides help for those with an idea for a space in the London Borough of Croydon. 

The Croydon Meanwhile Use competition gives winning entries in various categories £700, and runners-up £400 towards their set-up. Finalists also have the possibility of getting one of three bonus prizes of up to £500.  

For those with an idea for a Meanwhile Use in Croydon there’s a host of available resources to help you including workshops, and that’s where we come in.  We’ve been asked to share our expertise on creating a social media strategy and social media profile set-up at the Marketing Day at Matthews Yard on Weds 26th March.    

Lets get some empty spaces in Croydon back in use, creatively too.  The winners will be announced at an Awards Ceremony at Matthews Yard on the 30 April, 5.30pm. All are welcome!

 

10 tips on using Hashtags

 

The basics: A hashtag is a great way of grouping information together.   Just use # directly before a relevant work or phrase (with no spaces).  On Twitter it helps show up those words more easily in Twitter Search & you can also follow them on Facebook and Google+.  If you click on a hashtagged word in a message, it will show you all other messages with that hashtagged word.

For the basics, read this simple explanation by the Twitter Help Centre.

Our Tips:

1. Use a hashtag yourself where it makes sense, like current trends and topics.

2. Use the correct hashtag when joining a discussion or following a particular event/show/conference.

3.  Use hashtags to make recommendations like #GreatRead #NowPlaying 

4.  Use a hashtag to add context or irony to a message, like #fail and #justsaying or make one up to be quirky e.g. #funnythingsoverheardonatrain 

5.  On a Friday, use #followfriday or #ff to Tweet a message of support to people who you like to follow but PLEASE say why.  e.g. “#ff @DotSocialise team,  for great blogs on social media” – because it gives people the reason to follow them. 

6.  Set up your own hashtags, for events or for specific discussions create a Twitter Chat

7.  Try not to use more than 2 hashtags in one Tweet or it looks like spam and makes the Tweet difficult to read.

8.  It’s not imperative (hashtags aren’t case sensitive) but for ease of reading add capital letters e.g. #PurleyBreakfastClub (refer back to No 4!)

9. If there’s a trending topic relevant to your business/brand use the hashtag in your relevant Tweets to join in.

10. Read up on hashtag fails so you don’t get caught out.

 

For further reading for getting technical with Hashtags have a look on  Hashtags.org 

Google’s new email ‘Unsubscribe’ button

A couple of days ago, Google rolled out their new ‘Unsubscribe’ button. It comes up next to your emails from companies it thinks you might want to unsubscribe from. It’s a link that sends an automated email to the sender requesting they remove you from future emails.

I noticed my first one today.

It will make it easier to unsubscribe from marketing emails, but will it reduce spam? According to The Verge it won’t because it won’t pick them up as marketeers promotions and you don’t want an email sent back to a spammer, for fear of more spam! So, it will simply allow us to quickly and easily unsubscribe from marketing messages without having to scroll down to look for the unsubscribe link at the bottom.

It clearly won’t catch all of them either, as I’ve got a few others without the Unsubscribe button showing.

Google explain it a bit more here and call it Auto-Unsubscribe.

Blocking Online Adverts – Is this good or bad?

Ever since installing AdBlock Plus to Chrome, and enjoying being able to happily watch WHAT I WANT on YouTube without being forced to watch adverts first, I’ve been wondering what effect this will have on the future of online advertising.   According to this Forbes post, Use of Ad-blocking is on the rise, the use of ad blocking is growing at a rate of 43% per year.

 

 

So, I’ve done a little research here’s what I found.

Where initially Adblock Plus would block all advertising, it now apparently has a whitelist of selected sites and services whose ads are allowed through the filter.  These do seem reasonable to me if you read about what they class as non-intrusive ‘acceptable ads‘.  

Obviously, it is controversial, as detailed by Dave Lee, BBC Technology News – Is it ethical to block adverts online? 

I had a look through the The Internet Advertising Bureau (IAB)*, report mentioned (OK, so I didn’t read it all in depth – it’s extremely lengthy!) and found the following points make their case fairly clear. 

Below are extracts from the White Paper: Consumers driving the digital uptake – The economic value of online advertising-based services for consumers.

 P13 Point 4. Primary Research:  “…current ad-financed services generate significant value for the average Internet user, being an order of magnitude higher than what the same user would be willing to pay for eliminating the related disturbance of advertising and privacy issues.”

 P 14 Point 4.2: “Free ad-funded services generate the bulk of this consumer services surplus, highlighting the significant value of the ad-based revenue model for consumers.”

 P24 Point 5 : “the value obtained from using Web services remains six times larger than what users are willing to spend to avoid such disturbance. This means that the current ecosystem works quite well and that caution must be exercised in challenging the current system because of the risk of creating other imbalances.”

What this report seems to suggest/confirm is that Advertising basically helps pay for all the free stuff we get while using the internet, and the detriment is far, far, way out-weighed by the benefits.

So now I’m all for acceptable and non-intrusive ads, in order to keep a lot of what we use on the internet free.  

What do you think about blocking adverts and the future of online advertising? Comment below:

 

 *FYI The IAB is a UK-based trade association for online and mobile advertisers.

Facebook Updates – Tips from them!

In the ever-changing world of Facebook it’s hard to keep up with what might make your posts seen or not, and even the most supportive and fanatical Facebook marketeers don’t really know, and must find it hard to keep up!  

The best way to be sure has got to be to check with Facebook themselves. Below is an extract from their Newsroom from  21st Jan 2014 on creating content for your Facebook Page.

“Many Page owners often ask what kind of content they should post. This is difficult to answer, as it depends on who your audience is and what they want to see”…

“The best way to share a link after this update will be to use a link-share, so it looks like the one below. We’ve found that, as compared to sharing links by embedding in status updates, these posts get more engagement (more likes, comments, shares and clicks) and they provide a more visual and compelling experience for people seeing them in their feeds.”  

You can read the full Facebook post from their very own Newsroom here.   I hope this helps you. 

For more information from us, find us on Facebook!

Wendy Ager, for Dot Social